ALEC ROVENSKY


ARCHITECTURE

    Terra Dispositions︎︎︎
    Conservatory
    Le Murate
    Zeebrugge Sea Terminal︎
    Water Facility
    Water Damage︎
    Makoko Floating School︎
    Types & Rites︎︎

︎PUBLICATION
︎RESEARCH
︎EXHIBITED



EXHIBITION

    Dissimulating Matter︎ ︎
    Navajo Water Project︎︎
    Art Auction︎
    Migration Museum︎
    What is Home? Workshop︎
    Climates of Resistance︎︎
    Remembrance︎ ︎
    Spazio︎

︎ ORGANIZER
︎EXHIBITOR
︎VIRTUAL SHOW


MEDIA

    Geology︎
    Posit︎
    Slipcasting︎

    Built︎
    Freshwater︎
    Saltwater︎
    Videos︎

︎CERAMIC
︎PHOTOGRAPHY
︎VIDEO


Info —

Alec is the Residency Director at the Institute for Public Architecture, overseeing a new residency program at the Block House on Governors Island. He has worked at Jenny Peysin Architecture, the Port Authority and is part of the next-gen council at Madame Architect. He holds a B.Arch Degree from the Syracuse University School of Architecture.


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Mark

Water Facility


































WP / 2018
From Undergraduate Landscape Studio

           This is a proposal for a water quality research center and recreation facility located along the old Erie Canal in a state park in Kirkville, New York. The facility is intended to support the Center for Environmental Systems Engineering (CESE) laboratory established in 2000 at Syracuse University. Lab research is focused on ecosystem responses to disturbances as assessed through environmental chemistry and biogeochemistry analysis.
            The project helps support these research efforts while simultaneously generating public awareness and engagement. The snow drift-inspired series of pavilions establishes the role of this facility within the more extensive river ecosystem and landscape as its bold, rounded forms protrude out of the steep 50 foot north-facing slope. The 6.6 acre site consists of a research space, an education pavilion, a covered boat launch, water quality laboratory and a public promenade along the canal. These programs are interconnected by a series of ramps and terraces that flow through each building and around the site. The pavilions utilize the sloping terrain to create buried insulated spaces dug into the river-side.